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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The military's training center at Fort Irwin in California is complete with mock Middle Eastern villages. But as the U.S. combat mission in Afghanistan winds down, how will this facility change?
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · In the Ukrainian city of Donetsk, the opposing camps seem increasingly entrenched, despite a diplomatic effort to ease tensions. Pro-Russian forces refuse to leave occupied buildings and public squares in the east. It's an uneasy Easter weekend and neither side is willing to budge.
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · Russia is in the middle of a planned upgrade and expansion of its military forces, but global affairs professor Mark Galeotti tells NPR's Arun Rath that Russia's military has its limits.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Media

Apr 18, 2014 — Professor and economist Matthew Gentzkow, the recent winner of the John Bates Clark Medal, discusses how to predict media slant and use big data in economics.
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Apr 17, 2014 — The Los Angeles Register is a newspaper that just launched this week. Despite dropping newspaper sales, Ben Bergman of KPCC reports that the publisher thinks there's still an audience for print.
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Apr 17, 2014 — "Selfie" may have been the 2013 word of the year. But "belfies," or "butt selfies" are now in the spotlight. We learn more about why they earned a fitness model a spread in Vanity Fair magazine.
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Apr 17, 2014 — In 1954, the Supreme Court outlawed segregation. David Greene talks to ProPublica's Nikole Hannah-Jones about her story in The Atlantic. She examines the failure of school desegregation.
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Apr 16, 2014 — After years of circulation declines and painful staffing cuts, this year's two Pulitzer Prizes are especially sweet. David Greene talks to Marty Baron, the executive editor for The Washington Post.
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Apr 15, 2014 — Journalism's highest honor, the Pulitzer Prize, went to two paper for their coverage of the leak of National Security Agency documents. The Post and Guardian relied on data provided by Edward Snowden.
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Apr 14, 2014 — Winners of the 2014 Pulitzer Prizes were announced Monday. The Washington Post and The Guardian were among the notable winners, commended for together breaking the news of NSA surveillance programs.
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Apr 14, 2014 — Amid the Ukrainian crisis, Russia's state-run media has consistently covered the turmoil in terms unlike those used by Western media. NPR's Corey Flintoff reports from Moscow on the information war.
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Apr 14, 2014 — Months after exposing the National Security Agency's surveillance program, The Washington Post and The Guardian win a Pulitzer for public service. Donna Tartt won for fiction with The Goldfinch.
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Apr 10, 2014 — When Franklin Roosevelt first allowed Harry McAlpin to cover a presidential news conference, the White House Correspondents' Association objected. Now, it is naming a scholarship in his honor.
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