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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · China has begun investigations into one of the country's senior politicians. Zhou Yongkang was a former domestic security chief, and he's suspected of "serious disciplinary violations."
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Your Money

Jul 29, 2014 — About 77 million adults in the U.S. have at least one debt in the collection process, according to a study released by the Urban Institute.
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Jul 28, 2014 — One-click online shopping is changing how we shop. Stores with leases as short as a day are proliferating — meaning a storefront can be a designer clothing store one day and a test kitchen the next.
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Jul 28, 2014 — The airline industry and its unions support the bill, which would allow them to list ticket prices without taxes and fees. Consumer groups say that will lead to deceptive marketing.
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Jul 28, 2014 — Life transitions, from expanding families to job losses and promotions, can be financially stressful. Host Michel Martin speaks with money coaches about what to do when you are facing big changes.
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Jul 27, 2014 — How meaningful and trustworthy are seals of approval from the likes of Energy Star and Good Housekeeping? NPR's Arun Rath speaks with advertising expert Lucy Atkinson about their validity.
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Jul 25, 2014 — Experts are more likely than the general public to buy generic products — but not always. Here's a breakdown of which foods and drugs experts buy generic.
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Jul 24, 2014 — Seven years after the subprime mortgage crisis, the U.S. economy has not yet fully recovered. Now two economists have come up with new evidence about what's holding the economy back.
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Jul 22, 2014 — If inflation were to flare up, Fed policymakers would have to push up interest rates. Tuesday's consumer price report suggests inflation is low, but some say the data isn't capturing asset "bubbles."
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Jul 22, 2014 — Money market accounts are so dull that many people use them like checking accounts. But they're riskier than checking accounts, and federal regulators are proposing new rules to deal with those risks.
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Jul 22, 2014 — Pensions have long enjoyed strong legal protections, but recent bankruptcy cases suggest this might be changing. As a result, cities and states might ask more workers to accept a little less.
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