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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 18, 2014 | NPR · It looks as though the "comment period" for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline project will be extended, delaying a decision past the November elections.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the breakthrough Ukraine deal and the new health care enrollment numbers.
 
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April 18, 2014 | NPR · Ivan Soltesz studies epilepsy in mice, but says children with chronic seizures are his inspiration. He's closing in on a way to quell the seizures with light — and without drugs' side effects.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Education

Apr 18, 2014 — President of the Muslim Democratic Club of New York Linda Sarsour discusses why she wants the city's public schools to close on holidays like Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha.
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Apr 18, 2014 — The mass shooting at Columbine High School spurred schools to adopt "zero tolerance" policies. Do they work? NPR Education Correspondent Claudio Sanchez and former principal Bill Bond discuss.
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Apr 18, 2014 — Central High School in Tuscaloosa, Ala., was once considered a model of desegregation. Today, the school's population is 99 percent black. One family's story underscores three generations of change.
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Apr 17, 2014 — Government benefits enable military veterans to attend college, but accessing them is complicated. So how can veterans pay for higher education?
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Apr 17, 2014 — A new idea is making the rounds in education circles. Under the plan, states would allow students to go to college for free then they would pay back a percentage of their salaries after they graduate.
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Apr 16, 2014 — The Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test, or FCAT, is being replaced by a test aligned to the Common Core State Standards. StateImpact Florida's Sammy Mack remembers FCAT and its controversial run.
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Apr 16, 2014 — The new version of the standardized test for college admissions, set to go into effect in 2016, will do away with obscure vocabulary words and cut multiple choice answer options from five to four.
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Apr 16, 2014 — In 2005, a group of anonymous donors in Kalamazoo launched a bold program. It pays for graduates of the city's public schools to attend any of Michigan's public universities or community colleges.
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Apr 15, 2014The Address follows an intensive program that teaches kids with learning difficulties to recite the Gettysburg Address. And in doing so, it raises some tough questions about resources.
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Apr 14, 2014 — Loans allow many students to attend college, but they also leave graduates with big debt. The Urban Institute's Sandy Baum explains how skipping a loan payment could be more trouble than it's worth.
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