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August 28, 2014 | NPR · James Tomsheck was pushed out of his job as internal affairs chief for Customs and Border Protection in June. He warns the agency has become a paramilitary organization with little accountability.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · U.S. and Russian experts met recently on neutral territory, on an island in Finland, to come up with ways to resolve their countries' dispute over Ukraine.
 
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August 28, 2014 | NPR · Foster Farms has been accused of poisoning its customers with salmonella bacteria. But in recent months, the company has become a leader in the poultry industry's fight against the foodborne pathogen.
 

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August 27, 2014 | NPR · The end of August heralds the start to the final phase of the 2014 election season. As primaries wrap up and candidates ready themselves for November, NPR's Charlie Mahtesian lays out the political landscape.
 
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August 27, 2014 | NPR · Across the nation, state legislators are gearing up for Election Day. And they're well aware that their fates could be tied to national political forces like the president's low approval rating.
 
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August 27, 2014 | NPR · Irn Bru is a neon orange soda that inspires passion and may help explain the strong independent streak in Scotland as it prepares to vote Sept. 18 on whether to break away from the United Kingdom.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Sports

Jul 12, 2014 — Mark Miller chose his nickname because when he smells blood, he attacks. His new memoir, Pain Don't Hurt, tells of the heart surgery and alcohol problems that temporarily derailed his fighting career.
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Jun 23, 2014 — NPR's go-to books guru shares some "under the radar" reads. Several of her recommendations — including fiction, fantasy and nonfiction — will make you reconsider your definition of a map.
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Jun 17, 2014 — If books float your boat, we've got just the thing: magical barge battles, the search for the Northwest Passage and a trans-Atlantic cruise that follows in Geoffrey Chaucer's footsteps. Also pirates!
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Jun 13, 2014 — In One Summer, Bill Bryson looks at historical events — featuring the likes of Charles Lindbergh and Babe Ruth — from the summer of 1927. It appears at No. 10.
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Jun 6, 2014 — The World Cup begins next week in Brazil. Before it gets going, check out the work of an author who has spent decades writing about Latin America, and who has a particular affinity for soccer.
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Jun 6, 2014 — In The Boys in the Boat, Daniel James Brown tells the story of the American rowing team that defeated elite rivals at Hitler's 1936 Berlin Olympics. It appears at No. 1.
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Jun 5, 2014 — At the Belmont Stakes on Saturday, former jockey Donna Barton Brothers will interview the winner on horseback. Now an analyst for NBC, Brothers won more than 1,100 races before retiring in 1998.
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May 16, 2014 — In his memoir, the catcher opens up about getting drafted in the 62nd round, his feud with Roger Clemens and what it's like to go into retirement. Leaving the game, he says, was "like a small death."
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May 6, 2014 — The New York Yankees relief pitcher is revered both for what he did and what he didn't do — behave scandalously, pick fights, take drugs or chase big contract offers to other cities.
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Apr 12, 2014 — Nonfiction shelves are full of memoirs by people who can't actually write. They're brought to you by authors who suppress their own ego to write in a famous voice — in exchange for a hefty check.
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