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July 25, 2014 | NPR · Steve Inskeep talks with Honduran Foreign Minister Mireya Aguero de Corrales, who's in Washington to help find a solution to the thousands of Central American children arriving at the U.S. border.
 
July 25, 2014 | WBUR · Massachusetts is offering to house hundreds of unaccompanied minors who've been detained crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. One of the proposed sites is on Cape Cod, but residents are blasting the plan.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · The novels of John le Carre have been reliable sources of compelling cinema. The new adaptation of "A Most Wanted Man" stars Philip Seymour Hoffman in one of his last roles.
 

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July 25, 2014 | NPR · Central American presidents met with President Obama, discussing the influx of unaccompanied children crossing the border. So far, Obama has not seen eye to eye with Congress on possible solutions.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss U.S. policy options in the Gaza Strip and Rep. Paul Ryan's anti-poverty plan.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · Sayed Kashua is an Arab who writes novels in Hebrew and a sitcom in Arabic. A contradiction? Maybe. But his newest book is a good look at an often-overlooked segment of the Israeli population.
 

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July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

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July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

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Historical Fiction

Jul 25, 2014 — Appearing at No. 11, Amy Tan's The Valley Of Amazement spans two continents and more than four decades as it explores the connection between an American mother and her half-Chinese daughter.
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Jul 18, 2014 — At No. 5, Christina Baker Kline's Orphan Train follows a foster child as she befriends an elderly woman and helps her solve a mystery from her past.
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Jul 11, 2014 — At No. 15, Jo Baker's Longbourn reimagines Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice from a servant's perspective.
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Jul 10, 2014 — Jacqueline Winspear's debut mystery, Maisie Dobbs, set in England around World War I, came out in paperback a decade ago. A new edition testifies to the enduring allure of the traditional mystery.
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Jul 9, 2014 — Forget for a moment the spooky, restless dead. In Rebecca Makkai's inventive novel The Hundred-Year House, the ghost is just one of the many residents looking for new lives — and finding them.
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Jul 4, 2014 — At No. 3, Elizabeth Gilbert's The Signature of All Things follows a gifted botanist as she researches the mysteries of evolution and falls in love with an artist.
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Jul 3, 2014 — Jacqueline Winspear — author of the Maisie Dobbs mysteries — tackles the anniversary of World War I with a standalone novel following four intertwined, war-scarred lives, at home and in the trenches.
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Jun 27, 2014 — James Carroll's experience as a Catholic priest informs his new Warburg in Rome, which follows an American tasked with rescuing European Jews in the aftermath of the Nazi occupation of Rome.
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Jun 23, 2014 — NPR's go-to books guru shares some "under the radar" reads. Several of her recommendations — including fiction, fantasy and nonfiction — will make you reconsider your definition of a map.
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Jun 22, 2014 — Author Ru Freeman first turned to Alessandro Baricco's tale of a French silkworm merchant and his impossible love because it made her homesickness palpable. On second reading, it cured it.
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