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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Hundreds of civilians have been massacred in the South Sudan town of Bentiu. For more, Steve Inskeep talks to Andrew Green, the South Sudan bureau chief for the Voice of America.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · One year ago, a factory building in Bangladesh collapsed, killing more than 1,100 workers. Top retailers have begun inspecting factories more aggressively, but other steps have fallen short.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Some of the factors keeping low-income students from getting into college aren't always obvious to the public, higher education insiders tell Morning Edition's David Greene.
 

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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Syria will likely meet an upcoming deadline to hand over its declared chemical weapons. But the agreement seems to have emboldened the Syrian regime to use other brutal tactics, including a chemical not covered by the deal.
 
April 24, 2014 | NPR · As diplomatic talks in Geneva have failed to resolve the three-year-old civil war in Syria, the U.S. is undertaking a new covert program to send weapons in support of rebel forces there.
 
April 24, 2014 | NPR · The Israeli government suspended peace talks with Palestinians, citing a unity agreement announced Wednesday by Palestinian leadership. The Israeli security cabinet came to the decision unanimously, angered by Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas's decision to end a seven-year schism with the Hamas movement.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Top Stories

Apr 24, 2014 — The Feb. 14 release of radioactive material at the facility in New Mexico that contaminated 21 workers was due to poor management and lack of oversight, the Department of Energy says.
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Apr 24, 2014 — Secretary of State John Kerry said there is no question Russia is behind an effort to destabilize eastern Ukraine.
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Apr 24, 2014 — The news marks an important flare-up in a long-running war between teachers unions and the federal government over standardized testing. Washington has become the first state to lose its waiver.
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Politics

Apr 24, 2014 — JFK is running for a Georgia state Senate seat this year — John Flanders Kennedy, that is. He's a Republican, but his signs bear an uncanny similarity to the logo the former president once used.
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Apr 24, 2014 — The former Florida governor must reassure major donors about his intentions while avoiding making himself an early target.
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Apr 24, 2014 — Florida Gov. Rick Scott's plan to drug test state workers and welfare recipients ran into trouble in the courts. Law professor Pauline Kim and reporter Curt Anderson discuss the drug testing battle.
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Health & Science

Apr 24, 2014 — The Feb. 14 release of radioactive material at the facility in New Mexico that contaminated 21 workers was due to poor management and lack of oversight, the Department of Energy says.
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Apr 23, 2014 — Most of us aren't as maleficent as the fairy in "Sleeping Beauty," but we're still apt to spite others, even at risk of harming ourselves. Psychologists are trying to figure out why.
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Apr 23, 2014 — For decades, a mysterious quacking "bio-duck" has been heard roaming the waters of the Southern Ocean. Now scientists say the source is a whale.
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Business

Apr 24, 2014 — The Federal Communications Commission's proposal would let Web companies pay for faster access. But entrepreneurs, like Reddit's co-founder, are wondering how they would have fared with such rules.
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Apr 24, 2014 — Critics have blamed General Motors' delayed recall of a defective ignition switch on its dysfunctional culture. But there is already a shift underway to prioritize customers and communication.
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Apr 24, 2014 — U.S. Postal Service workers picketed in front of Staples stores on Thursday. They were protesting USPS plans to provide mail services inside Staples stores, using nonunion Staples employees.
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Arts & Entertainment

Apr 24, 2014Who Is Dayani Cristal?, a documentary narrated by actor Gael Garcia Bernal, examines the journey that costs many migrants to the United States their lives.
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Apr 24, 2014 — The revenge drama Blue Ruin demonstrates that the famous dish, often served more cool than cold, can sometimes be more dangerous in the hands of the sincere but inept.
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Apr 24, 2014 — The office has long been seen as a symbol of boredom: It's a killer of spirits, a destroyer of spontaneity. But reviewer Rosecrans Baldwin says a new book brings out its entertaining side.
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Opinion

Apr 24, 2014 — Steven Petrow is behind the new LGBT/straight etiquette column for The Washington Post called "Civilities." He says many letter writers are just well-meaning people afraid of doing the wrong thing.
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Apr 23, 2014 — The Australian state known for its marsupial "devil" has a local food scene that might be described as heavenly. If you can't try it person, get a taste with these Tasmania-inspired recipes.
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Apr 23, 2014 — Commentator Frank Deford considers a few athletic and cultural standards that have changed over the years.
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